My Studio

My job has me working inside and outside my home. Outside my home I teach a lot. Whether I’m in a classroom, at a library, or even a comic book convention, I spend the majority of my time talking and teaching about cartooning and storytelling. When I’m working from home I spend my time in my studio. Yesterday, a buddy of mine asked to see my studio setup. I snapped these photos and posted them to my Facebook page. When I was a kid (and still as an adult) I like to see other artist’s studios. I enjoy seeing what they keep around that inspires them. So, I decided to share my photographs here to show you what inspires me when I’m working.

This is my traditional drawing area. The table is my old drawing table. I use a tabletop drawing board because I can remove it to use the table for other projects like painting, puppet building, or paper crafting. My art supplies are on the table as well as under them in a large ArtBin. As you can see I like to keep a lot of decorations around. The shelves above the table are my Hanna-Barbera shelves. I’m a huge Hanna-Barbera fan. The shelves include FUNKO POP figures, Smurf figures, and other figures I collected throughout my life.

Right next to my traditional area is my digital setup. On this six foot folding table is my 27 inch iMac with my 27 inches Wacom Cintiq HD and my scanner printer combo. I don’t really keep much on there besides all you can see on top of it. Above I have a bunch of pictures that inspires me.

On the other side of the room you will find my bookcases filled with books and figures.

Next to my bookcases you will find my filing cabinets. One has a bed for my cat which he never uses. He prefers my chair.

In the corner you see my closet which is filled with art supplies, sketchbooks and other stuff.

This door is my entrance back to reality. Here are a couple more shots of my studio.

Well, that’s where I love to GET IN TOON! I hope you enjoyed the tour and I hope it inspires you. I’m a lucky one to have a studio space. Some aren’t so lucky and some have bigger working areas. It really doesn’t matter what your studio looks like as long as you have a comfortable space to create your art.

Until next time, remember, there is always time to…GET IN TOON!

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Author: Michael Grassia

Cartoonist

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